Creekside Science

San Bruno Mountain Lupine Seeding Year 2

In Mission Blue Butterfly, Rare species, Research, Restoration, Stewardship on January 7, 2020 at 3:02 pm

In 2018 Creekside Science was awarded a Disney Butterfly Conservation Initiative grant for work with the federally endangered Mission blue butterfly (MBB). This grant covers work with MBB habitat, with a focus on restoration of the butterfly’s host lupine species.

In December 2019 Creekside Science staff and Kirra Swenerton (of Root Wisdom) installed 10 blocks of experimental seed plots on San Bruno Mountain using 50 Lupinus formosus and 50 Lupinus albifrons seeds each. In addition to those experimental plots, 10 operational plots were installed, each containing 50 seeds (25 of each species). Lastly, 3000 seeds (1,700 L. formosus and 1,300 L. albifrons) were set out in expansion plots elsewhere on the hill. These plots join last year’s Lupinus formosus experimental seeding trials to further our understanding of how best to establish lupines in MBB habitat. The seeds were propagated in the Creekside Science Conservation Nursery. This is all part of a regional, interagency conservation effort to support lupine diversification and habitat enhancement for the recovery of the MBB.  In cooperation with multiple agency partners, efforts to address known habitat enhancement challenges through updated host plant mapping, lupine seed amplification and experimental direct seeding strategies are underway.

Think Big, Connect More

In Climate Change, Networking, Rare species, Research, Stewardship on January 6, 2020 at 3:56 pm

In November 2019, more than 125 members of the conservation community gathered at the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation for the official launch of the Bay Area Conservation Lands Network 2.0 Science Expansion. CLN 2.0 inventories, synthesizes, and projects forward the impressive collective efforts that have made the Bay Area a world leader in conservation, and provides that information to the greater conservation community and public at large.

Since 2006, Chief Scientist Stu Weiss has served as Science Adviser on this visionary project, bringing to bear scientific and GIS skills and his deep knowledge and love of Bay Area biogeography to the question “Which lands should be protected and stewarded to conserve the rich and irreplaceable biodiversity of the 10 Bay Area counties in an era of rapid environmental change?”  The CLN 2.0 team led by Tom Robinson and supported by the expertise of more than 100 volunteer scientists and practitioners, pored over hundreds of data sources – biogeography of flora and fauna, physical geography of landforms, climate, and hydrology, and human geography of development, laws, and institutions.  Those data were prioritized and synthesized into a network design.

The broad answer is 2.5 million acres conserved by 2050, half of the region (Think Big).  CLN 2.0 builds off the currently protected 1.4 million acres to further encompass rare and irreplaceable ecosystems and the species they support, vast expanses of more common flora and fauna, and ensuring connectivity across the mountain ranges and valleys of the Bay Area (Connect More).

For the full report (full of beautiful photos, many taken by Stu), online access to data via the CLN 2.0 Explorer, and to download an organized GIS project, go to www.bayarealands.org

Creekside Science Senior Biologist Christal Niederer Featured By California Department of Fish and Wildlife

In Rare species, Restoration, Stewardship on September 25, 2019 at 10:22 am

Christal Niederer was featured in a CNDDB Contributor Spotlight article this month that provides some background on how Christal became a vital member of Creekside Science as well as some information on some of our current projects.

According to the CDFW, “the goal of the CNDDB is to provide the most current information available on the state’s most imperiled elements of natural diversity and to provide tools to analyze these data.”

Christal has been a regular contributor to the database over the years, and she clearly articulates why this is the case: “It feels good to know you’re the current expert on a particular occurrence, especially if you’ve led a project to reestablish that taxon. Having your report change the occurrence from ‘presumed extirpated’ to ‘extant’ feels really good. I’m always amazed how much information is in the CNDDB when I need to look something up. We’re all so lucky to have this resource, and we need to take the time to keep it current.”

Enjoy the article!

https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Data/CNDDB/News/cnddb-contributor-spotlight-christal-niederer