Creekside Science

Fine-scale modeling of bristlecone pine treeline position in the Great Basin, USA

In Climate Change, Research, Topoclimatic Studies on January 10, 2017 at 11:01 am

A multi-year collaboration between Western Washington University (Andrew Bunn, Jamis Bruening, Tyler Tran), The Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research at University of Arizona (Matthew Salzer) and Creekside Science (Stu Weiss, Jimmy Quenelle) culminates with the publication of this paper!

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It was an honor to work with this dedicated team over time and over diverse terrain, from various lab locations to the AGU conference in San Francisco to the peaks, ridges and canyons of the Sierra, White Mountains and Snake Range.

Congratulations to Jamis and Tyler for recently earning their Master’s Degrees

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from Western Washington University for their work on this project! Enjoy the paper!

Ardenwood Historic Farm Monarch Habitat Assessment

In Stewardship on January 9, 2017 at 4:45 pm

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On January 6, 2017, Creekside Science began site assessment and habitat characterization of Monarch butterfly overwintering habitat at Ardenwood Historic Farm (East Bay Regional Parks District).

The primary goal of this project is to conserve the long-term integrity of winter roosting habitat for monarch butterflies at Ardenwood by developing comprehensive site stewardship plans.

Creekside Chief Scientist Flies High Once Again in the Name of Monarch Stewardship

In Stewardship on December 28, 2016 at 5:11 pm

In December 2016 Creekside Chief Scientist Dr. Stuart Weiss was hoisted high into the sky by way of a bucket truck to facilitate Monarch habitat assessment work at Rob Hill in the Presidio. Creekside Science is engaged in canopy characterization to assess seasonal solar radiation, temperature and wind conditions in Monarch butterfly overwintering habitat.
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Hemispherical photography conducted at different elevations increases our understanding of overall habitat structure and what conditions the butterflies require. This information guides comprehensive site-specific adaptive management plans.

Dr. Weiss was happy to check this off his bucket list!